Exploring the Polar Bear’s Habitat

Sea bears, or Polar bears, would be the world’s largest land predators, measuring up to 3 m tall and weighing up to 600 kg. They are still be approximately 25 years old, attaining sexual maturity. Though they look white or yellowish in color, their fur is hollow and clear, and their skin is black. The reflection and scattering of light causes their coloring. Inhabiting sea and the ice of the Arctic, polar bears would be well designed for survival in an acute environment. While webbing between their toes allows for successful strokes hairs and bumps on the bottoms of the legs offer grip.

When hunting for seals they use their sense of odor. They could detect the odour of an aglu, or a seal’s breathing hole, up to one mile away. A bear attack the seal’s mind when it comes to air and will wait by the hole, once located. In hunting conditions, the bear will eat the seal fat, leaving animals the carcass. Polar bears will eat nearly anything, when food is scarce. When in proximity to human settlements, they’ve even been known to eat trash like Styrofoam. Polar bears do not hibernate like bears, but a state is entered into by females while pregnant. After mating in the spring, a female polar bear spends the summer ingesting considerable amounts of food and building a maternity den in a snow drift to prepare for the arrival of her cubs.

Some of the most revealing documentary footage of Polar Bears has come from the BBC in it’s current show – Blue Planet 2.    David Attenborough has presented many shows over the years concerning these beautiful creatures and you can get some of them online.  You just need to hide your IP address to access from outside the country however be careful as the BBC has been blocking VPN programmes recently.

At the fall, she enters into a dormant state, remaining this way even when it gives birth. The litter, usually two cubs, will probably spend 2 years with their mother learning essential searching and survival skills. Polar bears would be currently listed as vulnerable from IUCN’s Red List. Global warming greatly impacts the destiny of the polar bear. A reduction of large masses of ice results in limited access to seals. Not only does this adversely affects the health of adult polar bears, it also hampers the successful reproduction and nutrition of new bear cubs. Rising temperatures also result in unstable maternity dens, as snowdrifts melt and collapse.